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Saturday, 21 May 2011

In an open boat waiting for death

Fabled LandsIn case you thought we'd forgotten about the Fabled Lands RPG, the very latest news is that it is undergoing a thorough edit by the world's foremost FL authority, Andrew Wright, will hopefully be ready for release next month, and here is a sighting of the map and character sheet to prove it. Rara avis in terris commenticia.

19 comments:

  1. Wonderful news! It's great that you've got Andy involved, as he has a great feel for what's right and what's not - if only they'd commissioned his help with the Myriador FF conversions, we might have avoided ridiculous incongruities such as characters in the Nepalese-themed Kakhabad being called things like 'Ryan' and 'Farrell/Ferrell'.

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  2. James (Chalor)21 May 2011 at 05:16

    That map is looking _nice_! Very excited to see stuff starting to emerge. Hopefully the core book will provide enough inspiration to keep us all busy until the Sokara sourcebook :)

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  3. How does the combat work with multiple player characters, do wizards get spells and if they do how does casting work?

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  4. Ave Dave !

    If "commenticia" agrees with "terris", then you must write "commenticiis".

    Olivier

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  5. That map is looking gorgeous!
    Who's your current cartographer?

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  6. Olivier, I fear my Latin is very rusty. I thought it was simply ablative of commenticius? However, I am sure you are right.

    Everybody else, I can't answer the questions about cartographer, etc, as that's all being handled by Greywood. But I certainly agree that Andrew's editorial input is a huge plus.

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  7. Nice map and CS!
    Do you know if the FLRPG will be sold as a .PDF?

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  8. "commenticia" can be both the feminine singular nominative and ablative; the only difference would be a long accent "â" for the ablative; however, such an accent did not exist in the Antiquity.

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  9. The cartographer is Gill Pearce. The game will be sold as a pdf.

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  10. How many books are there for the RPG? Is it like D&D where you need to buy several books to play it, or is everything you need in one book?

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  11. Wanderer, as far as I know the rules are complete in one book. The other books are just source material and scenarios, so they help in creating adventures but aren't essential for playing the game.

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  12. That's what I like to hear. How much will the main book be?

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  13. A good question - and one that I hope Shane or Jay will be able to answer..?

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  14. Incidentally, while we're on the subject of languages, Kakhabad would not be the name of a Nepalese-themed city, as the -abad suffix is Persian in origin. I might just buy "Kakhpur".

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  15. "Pur" does come from Sanskrit and means "city, fortress"; cf. Greek "polis" and Sambahsa "poli". "abad" is indeed Persian, but one must remember that Persian was the de facto official language of the Moghol Empire until it was replaced by English when Queen Victoria became Empress of India. Still nowadays, Persian enjoys prestige in India, and the national anthem of Pakistan is written in Persian.

    Olivier

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  16. Very true, Olivier. Hence Islamabad, etc. I don't see much evidence of a Persian influence in Nepal, however. Still, it's only Fighting Fantasy - most of the place names are, I think, based on wherever Livingstone or Jackson went on holiday!

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  17. Price?

    http://shop.cubicle7store.com/epages/es113347.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/es113347_shop/Categories/Fabled_Lands

    While you are there, feel free to order it :)

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  18. Right ! However, I hope S.Jackson did not go on holiday in Kalkhabad ! :-)
    (I don't know why, but my Google account seems afraid of this discussion)

    Olivier

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  19. Paltogue/Warren24 May 2011 at 03:16

    OK, so maybe Nepal-inspired might be better - some of the place-names are lifted straight from Nepal, including Gorretanti and Kharé, and many of the names have a similar linguistic style (e.g. Shamutanti, Birritanti, Cantopani). When we add to that the northern Tibetan-style Mampang area (at least the names look a bit Tibetan), and things like Fishtail Rock, we can almost trace the route of their holiday! I've always felt that you should have had the opportunity to stop in a Kakhabadian equivalent of Pokhara, somewhere to rest, fritter your money, and get sucked dry by leeches, before hiring a guide into the mountains of Annapurna/Xamen...

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